Stevie Ray 8/27/90

A helicopter crash claimed the world’s greatest blues-rock guitarist 24 years ago today.

Stevie Ray Vaughan was looking pretty rough his last few years on the planet: drugs and bad habits.  I think a helicopter crash was a much better way to go than an OD, or a suicide, or some other graceless exit that so many of our most talented seem to gravitate toward.

Here is a nice collection of tunes published by a fan on Youtube:  SRV – The Slow Blues

1. The Things That I Used To Do
2. Tin Pan Alley 04:57
3. Leave My Girl Alone 14:10
4. Riviera Paradise 18:29
5. Ain’t Gonna Give Up On Love 27:22
6. Life Without You 33:32
7. The Sky Is Crying 37:50
8. Little Wing 42:31
9. Texas Flood 49:24
10. Dirty Pool 54:48

Lift Every Voice! Juneteenth

JUNETEENTH. On June 19 (“Juneteenth”), 1865, Union general Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston and issued General Order Number 3, which read in part, “The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor.” The Imagetidings of freedom reached the approximately 250,000 slaves in Texas gradually as individual plantation owners informed their bondsmen over the months following the end of the war. The news elicited an array of personal celebrations, some of which have been described in The Slave Narratives of Texas (1974). The first broader celebrations of Juneteenth were used as political rallies and to teach freed African American about their voting rights. Within a short time, however, Juneteenth was marked by festivities throughout the state,some of which were organized by official Juneteenth committees.  source

Allah Ack-Bama. It’s that time of year again

Wins against the Crimson Tide are rare for my Bulldogs. Heck, they’re rare for any ball club.

On November 1, 1980, the largest crowd in Mississippi history witnessed the Bullies defeating the top-ranked Tide 6-3 at Memorial Stadium in Jackson. Over the years, the size of that crowd has grown by thousands of fans who will tell you, “I was there when we beat the Bear.”

Two teams that ran the triple-option offense and played stout defense played their hearts out that day. It featured the inventor of the Wishbone, Emory Bellard, and the legendary Bear Byant. The keys to the Bulldog win were winning the turnover battle, and playing a more physical game than Alabama.

If my Bullies have a chance in the upcoming game, these will again be the keys to victory.

In the words of Emory Bellard, “Ohhhhh, was it good!”

The video from November 2, 1980 is a classic. It even has famous Coke commercial featuring Mean Joe Green.

Enjoy!

“Mississippi State broadcast legend Jack Cristil hosts his weekly show with Mississippi State head coach Emory Bellard. This show would be a little different as Mississippi State had just knocked off two time defending national champion and #1 ranked Alabama 6-3 in Jackson.”

Gingrich: “I can no longer endorse Gregg Harper”

Conservative Blogging Legend, Nuke Gingrich has concluded that 3-term Congressman, Gregg Harper no longer deserves the endorsement and support of common-sense conservative voters in the MS-3rd district.

“He hasn’t accomplished anything, he hasn’t done anything, and given the opportunity to make a principled stand, he caved faster than a spelunker on meth,” said Gingrich, amid fragrant clouds of Macanudo smoke at his southwest Mississippi compound.

“I should have recognized the bait and switch when Harper gained the support of the slimy Trent Lott.  I suppose I’m the victim of my own optimism.  But no more.  Now that Harper has shown himself to be an insider-Trent Lott Republican instead of a Common-Sense Conservative, I have decided that I can no longer  support him.”

gregg-harper-ms3Gingrich’s endorsement in the 2008 Republican Primary was seen by some as a pivotal moment for the Harper campaign, as polls which had been trending for his opponent, shifted dramatically and decisively in Harper’s favor.  He won going away.  It was an old fashioned whoopin’.

“I questioned Harper’s vote last week to end the battle against Obamacare, and politely asked for a response.  To date, Harper has refused to provide any answer at all, other than to send out a Press release, chock-full of fluffy piffle.”

Gingrich has provided the Blog with a copy of the note he sent to the Congressman in response to Harper’s “explanation” for the surrender vote, entitled “A Responsibility to Govern.”

October 17, 2013

Dear Congressman Harper:
 
Please tell me. 
 
Did you read the Bill before you voted for it? 
 
I understand it was an eleventh hour vote responding to a real or imagined crisis (this seems to have become the standard operating procedure, hasn’t it?).
 
Did you question the special $2.9 billion sweet deal for Kentucky?
 
Wouldn’t it have been appropriate to offer a clean, two-day CR to allow the Bill to be read by the Members, and posted to the internet as has been promised previously?
 
A Responsibility to Govern, indeed! 
 
Sincerely,
 
Nuke Gingrich
Somewhere in southwest Mississippi
CharlierossInterestingly enough, Gingrich’s old nemesis, The Club for Growth is making a splashy re-entry into Mississippi politics for the first time since 2008.  The CfG has endorsed a Primary challenger to veteran senator Thad Cochran.  Losing Gingrich’s support may provide an opening for the other recent favorite of The Club for Growth, Charlie Ross.   “I may have to go reconsider my position on CfG,” Gingrich painfully noted.

We interrupt this gov’t shutdown to bring you

……this very important message.
.

We are one week away from the 2013 renewal of the Red River Rivalry.

It used to be known as the Red River Shootout, but the sponsor, SBC-AT&T, didn’t want anyone to think they were condoning gun violence.

Horrors!

I mean, this is Oklahoma and Texas. The chances of finding an unarmed household (outside of Austin) are right up there with the needle and haystack thing. But I digress.

The violence that will occur 8 days from now won’t have anything to do with guns. The sounds of pain and anguish you will hear will emanate from the historic Cotton Bowl and will be felt all across Longhorn Nation.

It won’t be pretty.

The over and under will be a tough one to pick, because it will be entirely dependent on OU, and whether or not Stoops is in a merciful mood.

ShaggyBevo has already made their prediction:

shaggybevo-redriverrivalry
.

Heh™

We now return you to your regularly scheduled government shutdown.

.

#GAMEWEEK

The final countdown to the 2013-14 NCAA College Football season is upon us, and Game Week is here.

Yeah, Baby!!

Game One Predictions will follow on Wednesday.

 

7 days from kickoff     Mississippi State Football.      #Fight4MSU      #HailState

game-week

No. 7 Matt Wyatt played QB for the Bulldogs during the 1996-1999 seasons. During his career for the Bulldogs, he threw for 2940 yards and 16 touchdowns. He was named to the SEC All-Freshman team in 1996 and was a four year letterman for the Bulldogs, earning those honors for the 1996-1999 seasons. In April of 2011, Wyatt was named Color Analyst for the Mississippi State football broadcast crew, where he works alongside Jim Ellis and John Correro.

Where were you when you got the news?

It was a few months before my seventh birthday. The whole family loaded up in the car and headed out for the Drive-In theater. We were well prepared:  tuna fish sandwiches, pimento cheese, and a pitcher full of sweet tea went a long way toward making sure that we wouldn’t have to spend a lot of money at the concession stand. We also packed a couple of empty Coke bottles for the back seat – just in case.

Follow that Dream was playing;  the latest Elvis movie, and although I’m sure we had done it before, this is my earliest memory of going to the movies with my family.

We went to more Elvis movies in the next few years, but, 1964 and the lads from Liverpool changed everything.  Suddenly, Elvis was old, and going nowhere. Plus, the idea of going to the picture show with the folks wasn’t near as cool any more.

Before we knew it, Elvis needed a “comeback tour” in order to gain attention. In 1968, we were gathered at Uncle Pal and Aunt Doris’ house when the show began. That meant we could watch “in color”. Those words, along with “air-conditioned” meant we would watch a memorable evening of entertainment in comfy surroundings. And, what a show it was.

Here is the intro from that show.

**

elvis-presley-deadRed Ridenour left the workshop of his Clarinda, Iowa home in a hurry. He had some important news to deliver.

“Nuke! … hey Nuke, come here”

Did you hear about your fellow Mississippian?”

“Who?” I asked.

“It’s about Elvis Presley.  He died today.”

“Whaaaa?” I sat down on the curb. I didn’t want to believe it.

**

He was only 42 years old.

Also:  Read n2l’s recollections of The King here

UPDATE: you gotta see this! Sweet Baby Girl Sings Her Heart Out to Elvis in the Car.

This little sweetheart LOVES to sing when she is riding around in the car! Listen to her sing along to Elvis… she is an adorable old soul. You might just like her version better. 😉

I feel so much safer, don’t you?

no-weapons-allowed

#opencarry, #2ndamendment, #selfdefense, #whatpartofshallnotbeinfringeddontyouunderstand, #teaparty, #patriot

The Hill of Death

The Battle of Champion Hill, May 16, 1863.

About 25 miles west of Jackson, major portions of the battlefield remain preserved, including the Coker House, complete with bullet holes in the door and cannonball holes in the sides.

hill-of-death“Grant’s crown of immortality was won, and the jewel that shone most brightly in it was set there by the blood of the men of Champion Hills…Six thousand blue and gray-coated men were lying there in the woods, dead or wounded, when the last gun of Champion Hills was fired.”
~ Major S.H.M. Byers, Fifth Iowa Infantry.

I haven’t been back down there since they refurbished the Coker House.  I need to plan a trip and take the grandkids real soon.

The Blues is Alright

I grew up in Jackson, MS aka the Crossroads of the South, the home of MALACO Records and their homegrown label, Chimneyville Records.

King Floyd’s “Groove Me” was a huge hit for the label in the early 70’s, and it was kind of cool to know that R&B hits were recorded just down the street, and even cooler to say one of your friends played background horns for King Floyd, or Jean Knight’s “Mister Big Stuff”, Little Milton’s “The Blues is Alright”, and my personal favorite — any of a half dozen tunes from ZZ Hill including this nugget “Someone Else Been Stepping In.”

The magic behind Malaco, the “Creole Beethoven”,  passed away almost two years ago. RIP Wardell. You made a difference

Jones

Momma didn’t care much for George “Possum”  Jones.

His songs were about bars, honky tonks, women of questionable virtue, and (gasp) drinking.  Eddie Arnold was more her type.

But, I liked me some Jones.  That unmistakeable voice that was Jones.

This is one of many songs by The possum, and it’s one of my favorites.

RIP.

Bluebonnets of Texas

Beautiful this time of year.

blue-bonnets

h/t ronnie gentry

Toy Soldiers, Cowboys, and Paratroopers

soldierscowboysairborne

The liberals have completely lost it where guns are concerned.

Pop-Tarts eaten to form the crude shape of  hand gun,  a “bubble gun” causing a student expulsion, the hand-drawing of  a  gun getting a student suspended and ordered to undergo psychological counseling, pretend gun fingers, anything at all to do with firearms is causing unreasonable fear and loathing from the left.

It’s nutty, and getting nuttier.

Anyway, I was picking up some groceries yesterday at the Piggly Wiggly, and I noticed some interesting toys in the dollar bin.  I thought I would pick some up for my grandsons before they are outlawed.  I had all of these toys as a boy and so did my sons. I hope my grandsons will enjoy them as much as I did.

And, on a another note, this is an open memo to Colt, Beretta, Magpul, and other firearms manufacturers that are being treated as  undesireables in their home states.  PLEASE consider moving your operations to southwest Mississippi.  We have an abundance of willing workers who would love an opportunity to work for your fine companies.  We’ve got great music, unbelievably good barbeque, plus, you won’t find a more gun-friendly state in these United States.  Also, the cost of living is resonable.  Land is cheap, water is plentiful, transportation is ready and available; and, the simple fact of the matter is this:

WE WANT YOU  HERE!

If you have questions, or would like more info, please email me at  nuke.gingrich85@gmail.com.  I’ll do everything I can to assist.

 

Thank you for your consideration.

 

This is the World Famous Friday Open Thread:   A Free Speech Zone.

WFFOT:  Have you hugged your gunsmith today?

SRV: Life Without You

Three months to live

Writing a blog post generally begins with an idea, followed by a quick run-through, getting as much down as I can without losing the original inspiration.  After that, a quick edit or three, and finishing touches of a photo, then a title.

Today, I began with the title first.  Now I’m trying to backfill with a post.

Today is Friday, September 21, 2012.

Today, there are 46 days till Election Day.

Today, according to the Mayan calendar, we’ve got three months to live.

Today, Mississippi State is making final preparations to raise their record to 4-0 against another Sunbelt Conference opponent.

Today, if the Mayans are correct, the December 20, 2012 football polls will have Mississippi State ranked #1, and scheduled to face a Big-12 opponent, probably Oklahoma, in the BCS National Championship Game.


This is the World Famous Friday Open Thread, End of the World edition.

WFFOT:  And I feel fine.

 

 

update:  this is too good not to post

 

Yazoo Gator Hunt

This is a great story from Brian Bloom at the Jackson, MS, Clarion Ledger

When Jason Waddell of Learned and his crew of fellow first-time alligator hunters set out for the evening, expectations were not terribly high.

“We thought we’d see some, but we didn’t know if we’d catch one,” said Waddell.

As beginner’s luck would have it, the team soon hooked up on what they thought was a big one …

Yeah, it was a big one, all right. Nearly thirteen feet long! As they say  READ IT ALL .

 

.

We’ve No Less Days

I picked up the copy of the Sunday bulletin for the 60th anniversary service of the Alta Woods UMC.   On the front page was the customary wide-angle photo of the church sanctuary.  In the lower left of the photo was another steeple, that of the Alta Woods Baptist Church.  If the photo could pan a hundred yards or so to the right, you would see the Alta Woods Presbyterian Church, and a few hundred yards to the right of that was the Carmelite Monastery.

 
I would see a group of the Carmelite Nuns each Saturday morning at the A&P as they did their grocery shopping.  I didn’t really know how to address them, “Miz” just didn’t seem right, so I just called them “Sister”, even though I wasn’t a Catholic.  It didn’t seem to bother them, though.  And between school, the A&P, and sleep, the true passion of my week was the time that I was able to spend with the youth of Alta Woods United Methodist Church.  Because for me, there was only one “Alta Woods.”  And coming back to celebrate this occasion was something  wonderful.  So full of tenderness and love, that I believe  that the celebration, not just the date on the calendar, is the real gift  to share and remember.

Forty years ago, the youth group was huge.  I don’t remember exact numbers, but I think maybe 100 or so high-school aged folks would get together each Sunday afternoon for choir and Sunday evening for MYF, and on Wednesday evenings for Bible Study.  Some of the parents in the adult Sunday School classes could probably give a better estimate, as they volunteered to feed this ravenous bunch of teenagers every Sunday afternoon.
Late night Kung Fu episodes at Sue Mac’s, choir tours, and lot of other activites contributed to what Travis Tichenor described to me this morning as  “a magical time that we were all fortunate to be a part of.”  I’ll always be grateful to Travis for inviting me to come to the youth choir that Sunday that my family visited Alta Woods for the first time.  I got that chance today, to thank him.  That was cool.   I suppose I should have also thanked him for prompting Sam Morris to let me sing the solo part of “I Believe in You.”   I was the new guy, and way to diffident to ask for myself.  David White told me today that he thinks of that song every time he thinks of me.

I didn’t get much time to talk with Murray  Nichols.  I hate that.  I spent many hours with ol’ Murray in his red VW.  Murray made me an 8-track copy of the first Dan Fogelberg concert that was broadcast on WZZQ.  I played that tape until it was unplayable.   I think I learned all the guitar and vocal parts to every song on that tape.  Thanks Murray.  I miss you, Bud.

I wish I could have gotten to everyone that I wanted to visit with.  And for those that couldn’t come, I missed them too.  The memories were as sweet as the pecan pie at the covered dish lunch.  It was delicious, by the way, and my wife didn’t believe me when I told her later, that I didn’t go back for seconds.  But I couldn’t have seconds and see the people that I wanted to see.  These are the people who shared their love for God with me, who loved me and welcomed me to their lives, and to this day, even though I rarely see them, are some of my best friends that I have, or will ever have.   And, even though it hadn’t occurred to me until just now, I spent only two years in this nurturing cocoon.  In my typical Baby-Boomer fashion, I find myself surprised to realize that the entire history of this congregation didn’t revolve around those two years.  So many other souls have been a part of the Alta Woods family, so many I’ve never known, but on this day, we were one in the Spirit, breaking bread together.

And now I am reflecting on memories of years gone by, of places and people dear to me.  Family, friends, fellowship, tender love:  it really doesn’t get any better than this in this lifetime.   And that, my friends, makes the next one even more amazing to contemplate.

Bugs gotta eat. Same as the worms

Five weeks ago, Adam Mayes murdered Jo Ann Bain and her 14 year old daughter Adrienne, and buried them in the back yard of his Alpine, Mississippi home.

He then kidnapped the two younger Bain daughters and fled.

Mayes was discovered a few days later, and shot himself in the head. The two girls were unharmed.

Today, Mayes’ body was donated to the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, where forensic students
will use it for research.

Rebecca Taylor, the center’s assistant coordinator, said donated corpses are allowed to decompose outdoors so students can study the decaying process and the skeletal remains.

source

Good riddance.

My Confederate Ancestors Were True ‘Freedom Fighters’

How far we have fallen as a nation in the past 150 years.

Contrary to what most historians and uninformed educators have told generation after generation about the reason for the “War Between The States,” it was not exclusively about ending slavery.

I am a descendant of people who fought in the American Revolution against the British for freedom and liberty, as well as being eligible to join ‘Sons of Confederate Veterans.’ My confederate ancestors didn’t own slaves and didn’t want to, what they wanted was to be left alone by a Federal government that was intruding on individual and states’ rights…they wanted the freedom and liberty that this nation originally intended for its citizens.

Just as freedom loving American citizens fought to create this nation, so did the Confederacy fight to preserve those worthy goals. In the end, the Federals prevailed and the slow steady demise of our individual freedoms and liberties have continued unabated.

I have often thought of the historical significance of the “War Between the States”(a.k.a. War Of Northern Aggression) from many different perspectives and even more so in recent years, with so much discussion of the 10th Amendment. My thoughts were refocused yesterday on just what the conflict 150 years ago means to us today.

I came across a fascinating article, The Last Trench. It is too long to post in its entirety here, but I highly recommend clicking on the link and reading it to the end. I found it highly thought provoking and I quote the author’s final thought in the article and am in complete agreement:

To each and every foe of freedom and liberty in the federal government, let this message soak to your miserable bones: Your threats, your mistreatment, your unceasing attempts at intimidation, your arrogant abuse and slander of all that is holy, your raw brutality upon the helpless, your vulgar use of armed might upon the weak, your shedding of innocent blood, your rushing to a new world order of old world tyranny, none of this will save you from the justice you so richly deserve. Understand — you miserable pestilence upon mankind — that we shall do our duty as our ancestors before us. Know that we realize that we are now in the last trench. So step forward! Come! Our Colours await you — you need but take them from us…

Blood, honour, soil, faith and folk. Know ye then, enemies of liberty, that the last trench insures eternal memory and glory to those who stand in it. While granting to those who attack it only a miserable empty death for filthy lucre’s sake.

Come now our enemies before us! Drink of this cup we have prepared for you! And as you in your brutish force move toward us — understand that while we are in the last trench — you are in your last moments. Victory or Death — Live free or Die!

God Bless America and Go To Hell all filthy tyrants and usurpers.

Against all Odds

I wanted to share a story from one of our Contributors, Swampwoman. She and her husband are educators in the state of Florida. It’s obvious from reading their story that they are very interested in providing opportunities for their students to learn, even when others have given up on them. (courtesy GCP)

SwampMan and I had worried about what had happened to a former student for years. As a child, he’d been subjected to the most horrific physical and sexual abuse at the hands of those who should have protected him. His mom, also a victim, was helpless to protect him, herself, or the younger ones. As he grew older, he was small and thin and could go into rages when provoked. He was bullied/provoked relentlessly in school and fought back violently. He was often in trouble.

He was an ESE student. I helped him with his reading. I thought he was brilliant and creative and told him so frequently. He had a gift for writing and WHAT an imagination! My heart ached for the gentle, sensitive young man I could catch glimpses of underneath the sullen, combative exterior of a middle schooler that should be in high school.

SwampMan REALLY worried about him. He tutored him. He listened to his problems. He did not report things that probably would have gotten him arrested, suspended, and some mandatory jail time, preferring to handle it himself and talk with the young man.

Then something really bad happened and he was removed from his home and school. We didn’t know where he had been placed or what had happened to him until he graduated, then he came back to the school and told SwampMan how he was a better dad to him than his dad had ever been.

We saw him this evening at a fast food establishment. He came to our table to tell us how much we meant to him. He brought his manager out and told her how we never stopped believing in him. He showed us his car, and told us how proud he had been to cook our food. We are so proud of him!

So many kids that we’ve known with backgrounds like his are dead or in prison. We’ve so happy that he’s getting along fine, even in this crappy economy, holding a job, and being a productive member of society. The slight young man is now a well-muscled, confident, handsome man.

Well done.

And it makes me wonder

English: Newt Gingrich at a political conferen...

Gingrich

“Hey, can you play, Stairway to Heaven?”

And, for the first time in a long while, I didn’t automatically change the channel.

It wasn’t like I had to break out the air guitar or anything.  Besides, it was only a short drive to the polls, and as an official “undecided” voter, I needed some background music to listen to while I was making up my mind.   Santorum or Gingrich, 6 of one … half dozen of the other.  Only thing is, I’ve wanted to vote for Gingrich for President for a long time, and this is the first opportunity I’ve had.  I’ll vote for Santorum if he gets the nomination, and I don’t feel the same way about Romney.

Over the past week, I’ve received a couple of phone calls each from Santorum and Gingrich supporters, but  easily 2 dozen Romney robo-calls.  Each call was a negative info hit about Santorum or Gingrich.  I kept remembering Barbara  Bush last week whining about all of the negative campaigning, and how it is hurting her guy Mitt — but it’s always Romney doing the negative campaigning.

There’s a sign on the wall, but she wants to be sure, cause you know sometimes words have two meanings ..

I am tired of it, too.  It got to where would just hang up on the Romney calls.  The talking heads are saying he has outspent  his competition 5 to 1, but it seems a lot more than that. Romney has been all over TV.  Gingrich has been on radio.  Santorum has been on TV, but not that often.

The big question might just be turnout.  I voted around 11 AM and was #28 on the roll.  There was no crowd at all.  Only one other voter at the poll.  If the turnout is as light as my experience indicates, the best organization will be favored, and that means Romney. .

And it makes me wonder …

My prediction for Mississippi:  Romney 39, Gingrich 30, Santorum 21, Paul 9.

Update:  Just got another robo-call from the romney campaign.  If he loses, it won’t be because he didn’t leave it on the court.

More from:  Y’all Politics;      Jxn Jambalaya

.

Which was your piece of chicken?

This evening at Supper, I was taken on one of those memory jogs that lasts only a few seconds, but is as clear and vivid as any, by a question my wife asked her brother.

“How were your gizzards?”

And just like that I was sitting at the kitchen table 40 years ago in Natchez, waiting for the Blessing to be asked, and eyeing the prize that was the staple of so many Jones family Sunday dinners.

Momma’s fried chicken.

Brenda would take a drumstick.  Mom preferred the pulley bone  and the liver.  I would start with two pieces also, a thigh, and the gizzard.  Nobody else liked the gizzard, but I loved it.  Especially hot, and I would always eat it first.  Frank would take a thigh and the back, and Dad would get the breast.  Later on, Frank would begin to get the pulley bone, and Mom would take the other breast. I attributed this to favoritism until I realized that Mom had simply given up on the idea of stretching two meals out of one chicken.

So she was simply deciding to go ahead and let us finish it all in one sitting.

And boy could we eat.  Especially when Frank and I were both in our teens.  Dad would claim that it took so much to fill us up that our legs must have been hollow.

Momma‘s fried chicken is famous in our family for its seasoned crustiness, lovingly prepared, to tasty Southern perfection.

Even the gizzard.

.

Haunting And Heartfelt Melodies Stuck In My Head

Thanks to one of my favorite television shows, Justified, the following songs have been implanted in my brain.

First, this song was written by Darrell Scott and is performed by Patty Loveless. Just as surely as Johnny Cash took ownership of many songs he covered, the lovely and talented Ms. Loveless owns You’ll Never Leave Harlan Alive.

Second, a song of the South and of sharecroppers. I don’t know the origins of the song, but the talented Gillian Welch takes us to a place and tells a story of love and pain.

Since I can’t get these haunting songs out of my brain pan, I thought maybe sticking them in your’s might be a good idea.

Highsteppin’ and Fancy Dancing

When you’re looking at the world and you’re wondering what’s wrong with everything but you.

Wake Up!

Live from Memphis ………

Whamma Jamma

GTH Alabama….

Geaux Tigahs!!

TIME NEVER DIES

Sercan Ondem

The Light

Inspire, Encourage and Empower

resultizedotcom.wordpress.com/

All about career, personal development, productivity & leadership

TIME NEVER DIES

Sercan Ondem

The Reset Blog

Start over, just don't stop

raulconde001

A topnotch WordPress.com site

My life as Atu's Blog

a small thougt for a big planet of daydreamer

Taffy Toffy's Blog

太妃糖的博客

tekehdddddddddddddddddddddddddddd.wordpress.com/

About life, the universe and everything

Drowning in depression.

Is'nt it great being a human!

%d bloggers like this: